2019 will be epiccenet of blood moons: Complete lunar eclipse schedule

After a flurry of February eclipse events set to occur in the coming weeks, 2019 is set to be the epicenter of all eclipses. Early Monday morning, the moon will be darkened by the…

2019 will be epiccenet of blood moons: Complete lunar eclipse schedule

After a flurry of February eclipse events set to occur in the coming weeks, 2019 is set to be the epicenter of all eclipses.

Early Monday morning, the moon will be darkened by the Earth’s shadow as it passes through the Earth’s shadow and takes on its blood moon phase. As the moon swings through the Earth’s shadow, it becomes about 70 percent blocked by the Earth’s shadow, making it a “blood moon.”

Related: These 2019 eclipse photos should convince you to view a total solar eclipse

In the United States, the total eclipse will take place from approximately 7:53 a.m. ET to 8:27 a.m. ET, and will be visible from the Oregon Sea to Mexico’s Baja California states, the west coasts of California and Nevada, and the end of Florida’s panhandle.

Viewers in the eastern United States — including the Southeast, central U.S., the South, and parts of Virginia and Maryland — will not see the full blood moon eclipse.

“The weather in the Southeast won’t be the greatest, and North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, all the way up to Baltimore will be having weather issues, which I think will make it difficult to see the total moon event,” said Joe Rao, a AccuWeather.com space astrophysicist.

If you can, try to view the partial lunar eclipse on Monday.

In the western United States, The partial eclipse will be visible between 1:49 p.m. and 2:53 p.m. EST on Monday, but some portions may not be as spectacular.

“Even if you see a partial eclipse, you can definitely still make out the moon,” Rao said. “You get a slight orange or rusty coloration in the moon when it’s in the Earth’s umbral shadow.”

Related: Why an eclipse is great for satellite imaging

Whether it will be viewed on the moon or the ground, a partial lunar eclipse is not unusual, although a “blood moon” is, according to Rao.

“This happens during roughly 50 percent of the full moon’s transit time,” Rao said. “During the 10 or 11 days when the moon is in the Earth’s umbral shadow, you see some of the most violent and violent looking eclipses. The entire moon area is basically colored by the Earth’s shadow.”

Related: Roaring wildfires caused by sunbathers

This year’s partial lunar eclipse is only the second to take place in February — although there are still more to come.

In early April, a total lunar eclipse will be visible from the U.S.

“A total lunar eclipse lasts all night, like a full moon. But a partial lunar eclipse is usually visible from anywhere along the lower limb of the moon,” Rao said. “The moon passes through Earth’s shadow through two stages. One stage where the blood red coloration happens and the other part where the horizon is covered by the shadow.”

Related: Blood moon eclipse to be watched by sky gazers in 66 countries

This year’s partial lunar eclipse is expected to be visible from approximately 5:58 p.m. to 7:25 p.m. EST on Monday.

Leave a Comment