British woman who died may have been poisoned, report says

Written by Tessika Kuwajie for CNN The parents of a 21-year-old British mother who reportedly went missing in early November are calling for answers and transparency from a top pathologist accused of performing mass…

British woman who died may have been poisoned, report says

Written by Tessika Kuwajie for CNN

The parents of a 21-year-old British mother who reportedly went missing in early November are calling for answers and transparency from a top pathologist accused of performing mass poisoning autopsies on multiple, unrelated bodies.

Steve and Janet Turner, the parents of Laura Leigh Turner, say the 47-year-old Ontario pathologist, Dr. Dirk Huyer, should not have been overseeing the toxicology testing on other bodies due to “blatant conflicts of interest.”

“As parents of Laura, we are trying to comprehend how the investigation could have continued as it did while the pathologist who was tasked with carrying out a criminal investigation was performing autopsies on multiple unrelated bodies,” they wrote in a statement Monday.

There have been reports suggesting Laura Turner’s three babies could have been poisoned in November 2017, after she was cleared of any wrongdoing in a homicide case, police said.

Laura’s body was found in the woods east of Syracuse, New York, last month after it was reportedly found by a hunter.

The Huyers and Turner family attorneys declined to reveal which deaths the pathologist was reportedly involved in, though they say each involved the “medical neglect” of people born alive or then removed from the womb, according to a statement from their law firm, Simoes, Stokes, Farrell & Cole

A statement posted to the family’s Facebook page Saturday by The New York Post says a post-mortem toxicology test on a newborn died after a report by the Ontario pathologist indicated it had been “injected with poison.”

“No official record of death has been kept,” the post alleges.

An autopsy ordered last month, after a woman in her early 20s was found dead in a rural area and a skull was found near a stream, has also been canceled, the New York Post says.

A Wednesday statement on Facebook from the Turner family’s lawyers says: “The Toronto Star has reported that post-mortem toxicology tests on at least three children were performed by Dr. Huyer.”

‘Do not involve Dr. Huyer’

Laura’s parents say they have requested Huyer’s complete log of where he has performed autopsies and the results of toxicology tests on the baby reports, and were also seeking documents detailing the toxicology results of former clients.

“We are thankful for any assistance provided to us by law enforcement in any of these matters. We believe they are concerned about the fate of Laura and we understand. However, it is essential that any information obtained is redacted so that the integrity of the investigation and any future investigation is preserved,” the statement said.

“We believe that Dr. Huyer does not possess the mental capacity to perform the type of work required in his current role, and our investigators are considering their next steps on this matter.”

Lawyers for the Huyers say their client “is in full compliance with his obligations and that he does not have the mental capacity to remain a practicing pathologist.”

“They ask that law enforcement do not involve Dr. Huyer in the investigative and administrative process in this matter, and any negative information regarding Dr. Huyer be fully redacted,” the statement said.

The complaint remains under investigation by the Inspector General of Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

A follow-up statement Monday by The New York Post says the Toronto Star interviewed an anonymous source last week who said three unrelated deaths under the man’s watch involved infants born alive or otherwise removed from their mothers.

The Star also obtained a copy of the autopsy report of another baby, the 27-year-old son of a friend of the Huyers. The report suggests he died of a combination of drugs as a result of drugs administered to another person.

A representative for Ontario’s coroner’s office told CNN this week they could not comment on individual cases or the circumstances, including when the death occurred and a toxicology report was completed.

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