Drivers beware: Parking spots painted on this Toronto street prove to be a ticket trap for confused motorists

On an otherwise picture-perfect lane, there lies the small-town charm of an illegal parking ticket trap Drivers beware: Parking spots painted on this Toronto street prove to be a ticket trap for confused motorists…

Drivers beware: Parking spots painted on this Toronto street prove to be a ticket trap for confused motorists

On an otherwise picture-perfect lane, there lies the small-town charm of an illegal parking ticket trap

Drivers beware: Parking spots painted on this Toronto street prove to be a ticket trap for confused motorists

Unassuming residents of a Toronto neighbourhood were stunned to see that the tiny parking spots they thought were reserved for spaces reserved for individual cars only turned out to be signs that said, in English, “No Towing”.

Many drivers couldn’t work out why this was happening in Kensington Market, a trendy neighbourhood with food shops, bookstores and gallery displays on a main commercial street – and were left confused.

It appears residents of these pockets on the roughly one-lane lane were in the wrong, according to a sign painted at the entrance of the triangular parking spots that reads: “No Towing and Reservation parking space allowed for from the B5 to the A3. This parking space is reserved for automobile sharing commercial vehicles.”

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Though it is unclear when Kensington Market first became this way – or when, if at all, the rules were added – it seems no person wanting to reserve a space for commercial vehicles is ever allowed to do so, which is fine with local shops. They’re just hoping that customers will check with their store to make sure, instead of driving onto the street without first asking.

This is not the first time Kensington Market has been involved in a parking controversy. In 2011, it was revealed that parking limits in various streets throughout the city were purposely created to increase the revenue of community groups. The same year, residents at the Alfresco By Bisson Street Park claimed they had been kept out of the neighborhood by a mural of a scantily clad woman that was so large it had been painted over. Residents were prohibited from painting their own murals, much to their annoyance.

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