From a promising tournament debut to retirement

Domnica Cacic lost to Sara Errani 7-6, 6-2 to conclude the first round of the third largest event in the WTA rankings. Cacic was the favorite, with Errani ranked 128th in the world. Cacic,…

From a promising tournament debut to retirement

Domnica Cacic lost to Sara Errani 7-6, 6-2 to conclude the first round of the third largest event in the WTA rankings. Cacic was the favorite, with Errani ranked 128th in the world. Cacic, the former WTA No. 1, who was bumped up to No. 89, is now on a two-week break from the tour and has a good chance to climb back in the rankings.

Cacic and Errani were friends from their early days in junior tennis, and Errani credited Cacic for her success.

“We have known each other for the past 13 years,” Errani said. “We are best friends. I hope I can play in her best moments in the future.”

Errani reached the WTA Finals in 2005, 2006 and 2008, then retired after that year because of a knee injury. Errani (world ranking: 38) is back in the top 100 for the first time since 2013.

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Eugenie Bouchard, the former No. 5 tennis player in the world, will play for the first time since Wimbledon in a tournament two days later. She is going to the Bank of the West Classic in Stanford, where she is coached by her mother, Lois, and has made the final the last two years.

“That’s my favorite tournament,” she said on her YouTube channel. “I think it’s probably the best one. Everybody is just so nice. It feels so local.”

In the semifinals last year she lost to Laura Siegemund, a German, in four sets. Siegemund had never been further than the third round of a Grand Slam and Bouchard was ranked No. 3.

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Two years ago, it was projected that Torben Beltz would succeed Adam Wilmots as the head coach of a rebuilt Belgium national team. Wilmots was succeeded by Johan Van Herck, who is a veteran of the European championship wins in 1996 and 2000. And now, Beltz is on the way out, with former Roland Garros champion Henri Leconte taking over.

De Wit reported from Brussels and Shababee from Stuttgart.

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Richard Krajicek looked at his resume and saw all the teams that ended up back on tour when he coached these nations’ tennis players. He spoke to Pierre Collock, the head coach of the Netherlands team, and told him he’d like to coach the Netherlands’ men. “Not in the next couple of years,” Collock said, “but at some point.”

Krajicek has always been successful in doubles. He won the doubles grand slam with his father in 1980. Then he won the French Open with Goran Ivanisevic in 2000. He added one more title a few years ago with Milos Raonic. Now he is close to retiring from singles, having lost a testy exhibition with Alexander Zverev before the Australian Open, and gone 3-3 in 2017. He played doubles in a mixed tournament in Chile last month with his other son Peter, who is ranked 10th in the world in doubles.

But Richard Krajicek knows that he’s on the decline in singles, what with many young players coming up. So he wants to help bring back Denis Istomin and Viktor Troicki, who have been out of tennis for several years but are trying to revive their careers. The biggest temptation is to take a young Bulgarian player, Grigor Dimitrov, from another nation who has already posted decent statistics.

Collock doesn’t see the Dutch and Bulgarian stars in the top 200. He doesn’t think any of their rivals are that good, and he sees them as having to wait longer before playing their way back into the top 100. Meanwhile, Andre Agassi’s grandson Ryan, the youngest player in the field at 16, is hoping that he can stay out of the injury reserves.

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