Space bacon, another winner of space contest?

Space bacon has been delivered to the finals of a food-themed cooking competition, and space food champions may be crowned with the U.S. Space Agency now in the mix. An American chef was added…

Space bacon, another winner of space contest?

Space bacon has been delivered to the finals of a food-themed cooking competition, and space food champions may be crowned with the U.S. Space Agency now in the mix.

An American chef was added to the Canadian challenge in the International Space Station Living Laboratory Challenge (ISSLC), according to this blog entry by the contest organizers. The contest now consists of eight finalists competing for the chance to win the funding and encouragement to continue their ideas.

Space bacon’s involvement is tied to the experiments done in the space station’s Life Lab testing many different foods, including the famous space bacon from the McDonald’s One Luncheon Sub.

“Some of the research will explore the effects of space-borne condiments such as food preservatives, fats, oils, spices, and other additives,” the ISSLC website states. “The hope is that this knowledge will be put to good use by future spacefaring missions.”

The space bacon “has been given to the astronauts to use in experiments on the Space Station to test space food’s ability to withstand exposure to the space environment.”

The other finalists in the Canadian competition are:

Bacon Bites, Philippines, the innovation of Andrew Thomas of Vancouver, British Columbia. The bacon was used to cook various items inside the ISSLC.

Daimen Pork Bacon, Japan, created by Kobayashi-san of Daimen Tyutaku, Japan.

Flatcake Flamin’ Hot Dogs, U.S., project of Josh Flanagin of Chicago, Illinois.

Frozen Rabbit Fries, Sweden, created by Daniel Martinsson of Gothenburg, Sweden.

First Head Cheeseburger, Canada, creation of Mike Jennings of Saskatchewan, Canada.

Spicy Chicken, Kazakhstan, introduced by Dan Simogka of France.

Worms in a Tarragon Feta Sauce, Kazakhstan, created by Qastal Nurbar.

Canada is only one of three countries participating in the cooking challenge, along with Kazakhstan and Sweden.

“In addition to international recognition, funding and resources, the ISSLC will generate interest among students and the public by providing all finalist concepts a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be depicted in an image on Canada’s official space agency website, accompanied by a stamp,” the ISSLC website states.

The space bacon competitor was named; his/her work will be on display at the Canadian Society for Nutrition Sciences summer conference in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, in September.

“The space bacon competition is an engaging experience,” said Amy Fipke, editor-in-chief of Canadian Science Magazine, the official journal of the Canadian Society for Nutrition Sciences. “I am excited to see what the finalists come up with and hope everyone enjoys it.”

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