Women working in the medical profession earn up to $6.6 less an hour than men

Studies have shown that when women enter the workforce for the first time in their lives, as many as 78 percent of them face discrimination based on their gender. Women earn an average of…

Women working in the medical profession earn up to $6.6 less an hour than men

Studies have shown that when women enter the workforce for the first time in their lives, as many as 78 percent of them face discrimination based on their gender. Women earn an average of $6.6 less an hour than men when they start their first jobs in the medical professions, according to a recent study.

The study, co-authored by Dr. James F. Picerno, a professor of medicine at the University of Michigan, used data from Americans’ Survey of Income and Program Participation, a Pew Research Center survey of 18,558 adults conducted in 2005-2010. The researchers examined respondents’ health insurance data from 2007 and 2012, finding that women in the medical profession earned an average of $68,764 compared to $81,923 for men in those same years.

Not only do women earn less than men in the medical profession, they also face slight obstacles when it comes to getting admitted to medical school. The study showed that women get admitted to medical school at a rate 16 percentage points lower than their male peers.

The amount of income that men and women earn at medical school varies. In some cases, the gap is so significant that women can end up working until age 77 and still not achieve the same level of financial success as men. Dr. Drey James, a professor at NYU Medical Center, found that only 15 percent of women who received full scholarships from her residency program reached a six-figure annual income in their careers.

“It’s not just what is done to women at medical school, but it’s how they are treated during medical school,” said James. “It’s never described in the school syllabus or provided to the women there as anything from a different value than men.”

Dr. Debby Sheftell, a professor of ophthalmology at Vanderbilt University, said that the focus on tenure and creating strong educational programs is key to the women’s attainment of six-figure income — and also an effort toward preventing gender discrimination from perpetuating itself.

“Men already have salary and peer recognition and advancement opportunities that women do not get,” she said. “It is equally unfair and hurtful to women to keep women down and not let them advance.”

Read the full story at The Washington Post.

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