You’re being ‘badly advised’ to try to photograph the Great American Sky

With the start of another meteor shower coming this week, professionals are advising that you’re being “badly advised” to try and photograph the Aurora Borealis. At 9 p.m. ET on Thursday, Feb. 14, the…

You’re being ‘badly advised’ to try to photograph the Great American Sky

With the start of another meteor shower coming this week, professionals are advising that you’re being “badly advised” to try and photograph the Aurora Borealis.

At 9 p.m. ET on Thursday, Feb. 14, the moon will not interfere with the brightness of the Aurora. It will be just 70 percent illuminated, meaning that the resulting green and red hues will be a lot more prominent than usual.

“To wait for this time of year is disastrous if you don’t intend to be anywhere near the Northern Hemisphere. You’re going to get wiped out,” explains Laura Paridis, a professional photographer from Rotherham, in South Yorkshire, England.

By contrast, photographers who will be close to the Northern Hemisphere on Feb. 14 will be able to capture a dazzling combination of shooting stars and the northern lights.

“If you’re approaching to the aurora region, preferably very close to the horizon, you’ll see lots of shooting stars,” explains Sarah Wood, a science and astrophotography teacher. “But, the aurora will also be very visible over populated areas like Scotland and Germany — at the highest latitudes.”

In Northern Europe, the Aurora is known as the wintertime aurora borealis. The magical light show doesn’t really come into full bloom until the northern spring.

Read the full story at NewsWeek.

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